Albuquerque Journal
4/3/15

In this article highlighting A Horseback Ride to the Soul’s Best Documentary Award at The New Mexico Filmmaker’s Showcase,Ms. Barry Broustra discusses the similarities between horseback riding and filmmaking. In the same way that Aimée defines herself as a horse advocate, she sees filmmaking as her path to telling the stories of those whose voices go unheard.


Santa Fe Reporter
7/8/2015

In the Three Questions column, Ms. Barry Broustra explains how her family’s legacy of Irish immigration helped her to understand the Native American experiences of language loss and cultural assimilation, topics explored in her film, The Young Ancestors, winner of Best Documentary at the New Mexico Women in Film Fiesta.

Santa Fe Radio Café
6/16/15

Mary-Charlotte Domandi interviews Ms. Barry Broustra about her film, The Young Ancestors and her lecture at St. John’s College, “Reciprocity in Storytelling.” Aimée describes the difference between revitalization and sustainability of Native languages and why the work to save Native languages is vital. When Natives don’t speak their language they lose an essential element of their participation in the ceremonies. These ceremonies honor and celebrate tribal connection to the land and to their ancestors.

Richard Eeds Podcast
7/8/15

In this interview by Richard EEds, Ms. Barry Broustra talks about the generational trauma around language experienced by many tribes. Aimée speaks to the U.S. policies of boarding schools and relocation programs addressed in her film, The Young Ancestors. As one 19th century Commissioner of Indian Affairs wrote: “It costs one million dollars in warfare to kill an Indian. It costs twelve hundred dollars to ‘educate’ an Indian for eight years.”

The Santa Fe New Mexican
7/1//15

Ms. Barry Broustra, in this article, underscores the urgency to save Indigenous languages. Language loss can, metaphorically speaking, happen overnight. When a language becomes extinct it threatens the identity of the tribe and the individual. Aimée emphasizes that each effort to restore Native languages contributes to the healing process.